The Service You Don’t Need to Go To

Homily at St Philip Evans on the Second Sunday of Advent, Year B.

This Wednesday evening, there’s a special service for people who don’t need to go to confession.

Canon Matthew Jones will be going, Canon William Isaac will be there, and I’m going too. We’ll be hearing confessions of people who don’t need to go.

There are times in our lives we really do need to go to confession. We’ve made a terrible choice, perhaps under extreme pressure, and we need the relief of hearing the priest say that our sins are forgiven. Or perhaps we’ve truly committed a mortal sin – for some reason we have knowingly walked away from God, and instantly regretted it. For these times – and for the person who has come to their senses after many years away from God – we run a weekly emergency clinic. I sit in the confessional every Saturday afternoon and Thursday evening. But that’s not why we run an Advent Penitential Service.

At this time of year, we’re challenged to look back and look forward. Television will be full of “reviews of 2017” and then we might make New Year’s Resolutions. Perhaps we’ll spend Christmas together with distant family members, needing us to resolve some longstanding disagreement. In this Advent time of waiting, what’s most important is to stop and take a good look at ourselves.

Don’t panic. Don’t be afraid. Jesus is already looking at you, and he likes what he sees. More than likes, in fact. He loves you. Whatever you’ve done, he loves you. He loved you enough to die for you. To us belongs the same good news Isaiah brought to Jerusalem – your sins have already been paid for!

There is one thing he would like you to do. Prepare a straight way for him to come to you. No speed bumps. No potholes. He would like to step smoothly into your life. That’s why we have an Advent Penitential. It’s a time to stop and look at the small obstacles in our lives that get in His way.

During the past year, we’ve heard a lot about the expectations Our Lord has of those who belong to his church. It’s always tricky when we think about things we ‘should’ have done. It’s much easier to know we’ve sinned when something is forbidden. But there are many things we ‘should’ do jostling for our time, money and attention. How much time should we have given to prayer this week? How great a gift should we have given to charity this year? How much time and money should we have given to our dependent family members? How much care have we taken of ourselves?

We can prepare for a good confession by asking ourselves a few questions.

We are called to worship. Have we put God first in our lives by taking time to pray each day and each week?

We are called to help in our parish and in the wider community. Have we given help graciously even what it was possible but inconvenient? Did we volunteer to give help rather than waiting to be asked?

We make our church community strong when we spend time getting to know each other. We make our faith strong when we take time to explore God’s Word and the Church’s teaching. Have we made good use of this year’s opportunities to connect and explore?

By our baptism, each one of us is an ambassador for Christ. Have we talked openly about our faith, even when we have been unsure how other people would react? Have we tried to invite anyone who’s not already a churchgoing Catholic to share or faith or visit our church?

This weekend, Archbishop George invites us to remember the sick and retired priests of this diocese. These men chose to serve you and your fellow Catholics in years gone by, giving up the possibility of earning a salary or saving for a pension. When we priests make the commitment of celibacy so we can give our utmost to serve you, the Bride of Christ, the Bishop makes a commitment on your behalf to look after the financial needs of priests who become too ill or infirm to continue to serve. But Archbishop George can only fulfill your commitment using your gifts. Perhaps the new calendar year, or the new financial year, would be the right time for you and your family to take a fresh look at your planned giving to the church and other charities. So ask yourself: during the last year, did I invest a fair share of my wealth in God’s work?

There are other questions we might ask ourselves, too, but they always boil down to two roots. Did I love God with all my heart, mind and strength? And did I love my neighbour as myself?

We don’t have to go to confession for the small stuff. We don’t have to make any New Year Resolutions. We don’t have to become the very best versions of ourselves. But why wouldn’t we want to?

There are two more sins it’s really worth looking out for. One is the sin of pride that says: “I don’t have to go to confession, so I won’t.” The other – that’s the one you know better than me. It’s that small sin, more of a peccadillo, that you don’t want to confess because it doesn’t matter that much and besides, it would be embarrassing to admit it. And yet… what would happen if you did? After that moment of embarassment would come an overwhelming tide of relief – and more than that, it would unlock some new grace in your life because Our Lord always pours extra help into our life when we celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation – the church guarantees it!

Jesus is asking you to clear out the obstacles. It’s a lot easier to trip over a small stone than a great barrier! And although it’s tempting to limp on with a stone in your shoe, you know you’ll feel better if you stop and shake it out.

So, here’s the invitation. At St Brigid’s, at 7 pm this Wednesday, there’s a service for people who don’t need to go to confession. I’m going. Are you?